Scientists can’t create a drug for the deadly pathogen that has killed thousands in 50 countries – Daily Mail

Scientists cannot create a drug for the deadly pathogen that has killed thousands in 50 countries because they reproduce sexually to produce new strains unlike other strains that reproduce asexually.

  • Candida auris infects the bloodstream and can sometimes lead to death
  • Scientists cannot devise a drug to fight it because the pathogen reproduces sexually and creates different strains as a result
  • Most infectious bacteria reproduce asexually, which means they create strains that are copies of themselves

A deadly pathogen appeared in 2009 that scientists have not yet treated with drugs because it reproduces sexually.

Most infectious bacteria reproduce asexually, which means they create strains that are copies of themselves – allowing drugs to be made.

However, Candida auris mates with each other and produce different strains each time.

The bacterium Clostridium auris causes bloodstream infections, wound infections, and ear infections, and can sometimes lead to death.

It was first discovered in 2009 and has since spread to more than 50 countries, where outbreaks have been reported and thousands have died from the fungal infection.

Candida auris mates with each other and produce different strains each time. The bacterium Clostridium auris causes bloodstream infections, wound infections, and ear infections, and can sometimes lead to death.

The study that revealed the cause of C. auris resistance to multiple drugs was conducted by researchers at McMaster University who analyzed nearly 1,300 strains of the pathogen.

The team researched and ascertained events of recombination or sexual activity.

Jianping Xu, a professor in McMaster’s Department of Biology and a researcher at the Canadian Global Epidemiology and Biological Threats Association, said in a statement. statement: The research tells us that these fungi came back in the past and can unite in nature, enabling them to generate new genetic variants fairly quickly.

This may sound intimidating, but it is a double-edged sword. Because we knew they could combine in nature, we might be able to replicate the process in the lab, which could allow us to understand genetic controls for virulence, drug resistance and other potential traits that make it such a dangerous pathogen much faster.

Pictured are four strains of C. airus, showing how different each one is, which is why scientists haven't been able to devise a drug to combat the pathogen.

Pictured are four strains of C. airus, showing how different each one is, which is why scientists haven’t been able to devise a drug to combat the pathogen.

There are five different groups or strains of C. airus that are known worldwide.

Clade I is isolated predominantly from South Asia, Clade II predominantly from East Asia, Clade III predominantly from Africa, Clade IV predominantly from the Americas, and several Clade V lineages from Iran in Central Asia.

The study, published in The Guardian, says the five entities differ from each other by 20,000 to more than 200,000 nuclear genomes. Journal of Computing and Structural Biotechnology.

Canada is one of the countries with three out of five known divergent strains and researchers note that some came from the same hospital.

Xu explains that if one strain becomes resistant to one drug and another strain becomes resistant to another drug, then upon sexual activity they can produce offspring that are resistant to both drugs.

“Mixing of strains in the same hospital, potentially in the same patient, creates an opportunity for them to meet and mate,” he said.

This study is about sex and the effect of sex on living things is often very broad. For fungi, this means that they can spread genes that benefit them much faster through asexual reproduction alone.

Little is known about C. auris, which is also difficult to identify in specimens.

What is known, however, is that those who spend time in nursing homes or have lines and tubes in their bodies are more likely to develop infections.

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